Impacts of the COVID-19 Outbreak on Universities in the United States

On January 31, 2020, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II declared a public health emergency (PHE) for the United States to aid the nation’s healthcare community in responding to COVID-19.  An increasing number of universities in the United States has a series of corresponding actions to respond to the emergency declaration.

After John’s Hopkins University claimed that the Summer College was not able to take any applications due to the COVID-19 travel restriction implemented by the U.S. federal government. Cornell Summer College also released the new refund policy to respond to the COVID-19 circumstance.

A large number of summer programs are aware of the situation, as Harvard Summer School says “we are closely monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation. As of now, the Harvard Summer School will run as scheduled.” The OCAC counseling department suggests that students be flexible with your summer plans. If a student could not go to a summer school as planned, there are many online courses that are as rigorous as summer school programs.

On March 6, University of Washington – Seattle declared that all on-campus classes are suspended until further notice, and all classes transit to remote instruction (video and other forms of delivery) for all undergraduate, graduate and professional schools. More and more universities have adopted the same move, such as Princeton University, Columbia University, Rice University, New York University, etc.

As we can see from the official websites of Sandford University and Harvard University, the university provides detailed information and guidance for students and teachers to follow.

No matter where you are – in China or out of China, no matter who you are – a high school student or a college student, we all face the same challenge – teaching and learning online. The OCAC counseling department hopes our students could improve time management skills and work with teachers closely to conquer this challenge together.  We believe challenges also bring opportunities. It is a good opportunity for students to learn how to study independently and how to use the time wisely, the skills developed by which are fundamental skills for college life.